From My Reading – June

“The only people who grow in truth are those who are humble and honest. This is traditional Christian doctrine and is, in effect, the maxim of Alcoholics Anonymous. Without those two qualities—humility and honesty—we just don’t grow. If we try to use religion to aggrandize the self, we will end up just the opposite: proud and dishonest. Humility and honesty are really the same thing. A humble person is simply someone who is naturally honest about their own truth. You and I came along a few years ago; we’re going to be gone in a few more years. The only honest response to such a mystery is humility” (Richard Rohr).

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

“Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can, to all the people you can, as long as ever you can” (John Wesley).

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

“Where is this risen Christ? Everywhere and all around us—in you, your neighbor, the dogwood tree outside, the budding grape vine, the ants popping up through the cracks. The whole world is filled with God, who is shining through even the darkest places of our lives. To “go to church” is to awaken to this divine presence in our midst and respond in love with a yes: Your life, O God, is my life and the life of the planet. . . .” (Illia Deo).

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

“Any paths lead from the foot of the mountain, but at the peak we all gaze at the single bright moon” (Ikkyu,  Zen Monk , poet, 1394-1481).

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

“It is central in the biblical tradition that God’s love for his people should not be forgotten. It should remain with us in the present. When everything is dark, when we are surrounded by despairing voices, when we do not see any exits, then we can find salvation in a remembered love, a love that is not simply a wistful recollection of a bygone past, but a living force that sustains us in the present. Through memory, love transcends the limits of time and offers hope at any moment of our lives” (Henri Nouwen).

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

“To work in the world lovingly means that we are defining what we will be for, rather than reacting to what we are against” (Christina Baldwin).

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

” Radical empathy, on the other hand, means putting in the work to educate oneself and to listen with a humble heart to understand another’s experience from their perspective, not as we imagine we would feel” (Isabel Wilkerson, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents). 

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦   ♦

“Something precious is lost if we rush headlong into the details of life without pausing for a moment to pay homage to the mystery of life and the gift of another day” (Kent Nerburn)

This entry was posted in Quotes and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to From My Reading – June

  1. Pat Cassell says:

    Karen, your writing over these past 8 years has meant so much to me since moving from Holland. I am so grateful for our initial time together with an apprentice group, for introducing me to Richard Rohr and so many other spiritual authors, and most of all for this wonderful blog. My heartfelt thanks!!

  2. Ruth Evenhouse says:

    Thank you, Karen. These quotes are so meaningful. I especially am considering Baldwin’s advice. I want to live in this world lovingly to give witness to what I am for!

Comments are closed.